Minnowboard Max: Quickstart UEFI Secure Boot

Minnowboard Max: Quickstart UEFI Secure Boot

This is the first of a collection of posts related to Intel's Minnowboard MAX development board. It begins with a barebones quick start leading to the simplest UEFI-based secure boot and paves the way towards a Secure Root of Trust Measurement (SRTM), where the "root" is the UEFI platform code.

By the end of the article the Minnowboard MAX will boot a Ubuntu 14.04 operating system using a signed shim bootloader, signed GRUB stage 2 bootloader, and signed Linux 3.xx kernel. The UEFI platform code will not be changed, meaning the out-of-the-box firmware will remain (no flashing), and any kernel modules or Linux executables will remain unsigned and unmeasured. 

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Embedded Trust (P1): Beginning to trust my BeagleBone

I plan to have a series of posts outlining my curiosity with embedded development and trust. Let's start with poking around where my (our) trust lies when deciding on a SoC for embedded development, using the BeagleBone [SRM] as an example. In this post we'll move trust from CircuitCO's (the Bone manufacture) included bootloaders, Angstrom Linux kernel, and Angstrom development environment to your own compiled bootloaders, kernel, and OS.

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How To: DIY (Improved) Inexpensive Fog Screen

How To: DIY (Improved) Inexpensive Fog Screen

Last month we built an improved version of the DIY Fog Screen found here.

We call it "improved" since we managed to create a thinner sheet of fog, maintain the projection longer (a fog machine is bursty), and thicken the sheet. We use the same technique of creating a laminar flow. Instead of using a window fan we installed 10 120mm [17] computer fans with a variable speed controller [20] to optimize the flow, since we did not know the fog density.

Since the original article doesn't explain the steps / tools / resources required to create a DIY Fog Screen, we'd like to take the opportunity and provide a "how to". In a nut shell, the screen needs to distribute "fog machine"-fog from end-to-end, width-wise, and keep the fog flowing downward sandwiched between two flows of air.

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SIM card curiosity, and a little Hardware Hacking

A few months ago I took an interest in the layer 2/3 protocols (and their implementations) for mobile networks. I quickly arrived at SIM card hacking and like a young schoolboy thought, “man if only I could MitM the hardware communication I could spoof other’s SIM cards and use free Internet!” Nope. Well, not nope, but it’s not that easy.

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